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Articles » Fossils

 

Vance Nelson’s beautiful new coffee table style book on fossils, Untold Secrets of Planet Earth: Flood Fossils, discusses aspects of the topic that will certainly be new to many readers. In addition the author adopts a chatty style which is readily understood by all. Complete with personal reminiscences and historical details concerning each topic, the author builds his discussion of each topic around spectacular illustrations. Read the rest of this entry »


In many parts of North American, the most common wild mammals one sees are  rodents in the order Rodentia. The largest known modern rodent is the South American semiaquatic capybara, which can grow to be 107 to 134 cm (3.51 to 4.40 ft) long, 50 to 64 cm (20 to 25 in) tall and typically weighs 35 to 66 kg (77 to 150 lb). Rodents are classified in one of the most successful mammalian groups today (Churakov et al. p. 1315). Read the rest of this entry »


You too can be a Dinosaur Detective!

You too can be a Dinosaur Detective!

Introductory

Any visitor, upon entering the Royal Tyrrell Museum (in Drumheller, Alberta), could certainly be excused for exclaiming “Wow!” as they catch sight of the first fossil on display. The visitor has already passed through a simulated scene of Albertosaurus models, posed as they might have appeared in life. This scene is based on a bone bed of 22 individuals discovered about 1910 by Barnum Brown at Dry Island Buffalo Jump Provincial Park. But we press onward and wow!! There high on the wall to the left in the next gallery is a Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton, almost all there, displayed as it was discovered lying in the rocks. Read the rest of this entry »


This is a very welcome new book. Our catalogues provide beautifully illustrated books on fossils for young students of the junior high variety, but little for interested adults that is not highly technical. Here we find a nicely illustrated book with discussion at an adult, but not overwhelmingly technical level. On each topic, the authors firstly present the evolutionary argument and then they show how this conclusion does not actually represent the fossil description, location in the rocks and comparison with other fossils. Read the rest of this entry »


No Evidence for Shark Evolution

No Evidence for Shark Evolution

Introductory

No sea animal elicits such fear and terror in the common people as do sharks. Gruesome shark attacks on humans are part of both the folklore and history of many cultures, including our own. Their predatory skill both fascinates and frightens us. Even though sharks rarely attack humans, when an attack occurs, it tends to be widely publicized by the mass media. Ironically, their very survival is now threatened by human-related activities, such as net fishing.

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Totally Unexpected Dinosaur Discoveries

Totally Unexpected Dinosaur Discoveries

Intermediate

It is interesting how dinosaur artifacts continue to amaze us. For example, in 1961, petroleum geologist R. L. Liscomb discovered a large bone bed on the banks of the Colville River in Alaska, not far from the Arctic Ocean. Since the bones were not perminieralized (fossilized), he assumed they were recent bison bones. He deposited some in a museum and for twenty years nobody gave the bones another thought. Then somebody noticed that these were Edmontosaurus bones (duckbill dinosaur). In 1985 palaeontologist William A. Clemens reported abundant dinosaur bones at the Liscomb site and in 1987 associate Kyle L. Davies described the condition of the dinosaur bones: “The quality of preservation is remarkable. The bones are stained a dark red brown but otherwise display little permineralization, crushing or distortion.” (J. Paleontology 61 #1 p. 198). Could such bones really be millions of years old as many scientists now supposed?

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Diatoms: Jewels of the Marine World

Diatoms: Jewels of the Marine World

IntermediateIntroductory

Diatoms are a major group of plants which float in open water, and they are one of the most successful types of microscopic algae known. The estimated over 100,000 known species are found in the oceans, in freshwater, in soils and even on damp surfaces. Most diatoms are unicellular, although some can form colonies in the shape of long filaments or ribbons. As eukaryotes or cells with a nucleus, they have highly complex cells, comparable to other eukaryotes such as mammals and even humans (Philippe, et al., 1994, Journal of Evolutionary Biology 7: 247). Read the rest of this entry »


Where Culture Meets Science

Where Culture Meets Science

IntermediateIntroductory

Dinosaur books are everywhere. There is no doubt about that. And you might well suppose that there is nothing new under the sun when it comes to discussions about dinosaurs. However Albertan Vance Nelson of Creation Truth Ministries has achieved the seemingly impossible. His argument about dinosaurs is new and fascinating. And the book is magnificent with beautiful illustrations from sites around the world. Also there are wonderful dinosaur reconstructions based on the latest scientific information.  Read the rest of this entry »


Wonderful Weekend with Dr. Marcus Ross

Wonderful Weekend with Dr. Marcus Ross

IntermediateIntroductory

The visit of palaeontologist Dr. Marcus Ross to Edmonton on October 15 and 16, provided a wonderful opportunity for students, as well as for everybody else, to learn from the insights and experiences of a recent graduate in the field of dinosaurs and marine reptiles. Trained entirely in secular institutions, Dr. Ross nevertheless was able to resist the attractions of the evolution model. In order to encourage others, he shared his experiences studying science in secular universities. It was not all smooth sailing. He encountered some major opposition that could have completely derailed his studies. Nevertheless he refused to quit, and in the end, he graduated with a Ph.D. in the appropriate field from a well recognized institution. Read the rest of this entry »


Tarsiers are chipmunk sized nocturnal primates known for their enormous night adapted eyes and koala-like body appearance. Their face, which resembles that of an owl, is the epitome of innocence. Tarsiers are covered with very soft, beautiful, velvety fur, which is generally buff, beige, or ochre in color. The head and body together range from 10 to 15 cm in length, followed by a 20 to 25 cm long slender tail. Read the rest of this entry »


Demonstrates Authority and Accuracy

Demonstrates Authority and Accuracy

IntermediateTechnical

John Whitcomb and Henry Morris’ 1961 classic The Genesis Flood was, of course, a wonderful work. Countless people, among them many scientists, have been positively influenced by its message. In the ensuing half century however, a lot of new information and many new arguments against “the flood” have appeared. The time has long since come for an update of the 1961 work. Read the rest of this entry »


“Beyond the Bare Bones” is the theme of CSAA’s Creation Weekend October 15 and 16, 2010 with palaeontologist Dr. Marcus Ross. All the events will take place at Mill Woods Assembly, 66 Street and 23 Avenue in Edmonton. Read the rest of this entry »


Dr. Marcus Ross Coming to Alberta

Dr. Marcus Ross Coming to Alberta

IntermediateIntroductory

Creation Science Association of Alberta is delighted to announce that Dr. Marcus Ross has agreed to speak at our creation weekend in Edmonton on Friday and Saturday, October 15 and 16, 2010. This young scientist brings with him a wealth of experience and expertise. He graduated with a B.S. from The Pennsylvania State University, a M. S. in Paleontology at south Dakota School of Mines and Technology and a Ph.D. in Geosciences from University of Rhode Island. His doctoral thesis dealt with the abundance and spread of mosasaurs, marine reptiles which are found in Cretaceous sediments, rock levels similar to those of many dinosaurs. Read the rest of this entry »


Celebrate Darwin’s Dilemma

Celebrate Darwin’s Dilemma

Introductory

The long awaited Illustra Media DVD on the Cambrian fossil record has finally been released. It was worth waiting for! The results are sensational. As far as visual effects go, this one exceeds the quality of Unlocking the Mystery of Life, and The Privileged Planet which Illustra Media also produced, and which set a new high standard for videos about nature. Read the rest of this entry »


Three Cheers for Long-Necked Beauties!

Three Cheers for Long-Necked Beauties!

ChildrenIntroductory

We don’t often think that extinct animals might have been examples of wonderful design, but they were! Even if we did reflect on extinct animals which were particularly well designed, we probably would not choose sauropod dinosaurs for that special category. Sauropod dinosaurs, you may remember, were the large plodding, four-footed specimens with long necks and long tails. They were probably the largest animals ever to have lived on land. They all grazed on plants. This was no doubt a good thing, since they probably were too slow to catch anything. So, you may well ask, what could be so special about these awkward looking creatures? Plenty! Read the rest of this entry »